Avoiding the strangling of your best future prospects

Escape Velocity Book Cover

I’m a big fan of the work of Geoffrey Moore, whose seminal work “Crossing the Chasm” i’ve cited before (in fact, the one page version is the #1 download from this blog). However, one of his other books is excellent if you’re faced with a very common issue in High Technology companies; having successful, large product line(s) thats suck all the life out of new, emerging businesses in the same enterprise. The book is “Escape Velocity”:

Unlike Crossing the Chasm, i’ve not yet summarised it on one sheet of A4, but have outlined the major steps on 14 slides. It sort of works like this:

The main revenue/profit engines in most organisations occur between the early and late majority consumers of the product or services; that can last a long time, denoted by the Elastic Middle:

Product Lifecycle

That said, there are normally products that sales will focus on to drive the current years Revenue and Profit targets; these routinely consume a majority of the resources available. Given a fair crack of the whip, there are normally emergent products that while not material in size today, are showing good signs of growth, and which may generate significant revenue and profits in the 1 to 3 year future. There are also likely to be some longer term punts which have yet to show promise, but which may do so in a 3 to 6 year timeframe:

3 Horizons

The chief way to categorise products/services against the relevant Product Horizon is to graph a scatter plot of revenue or profit for each line on one axis, against growth on the other (10% growth is a typical divider between the High and Low growth Quadrants):

3 Horizons to Category Power

Any products or services on Horizon 0 needs to be shielded from core resources and to be optimised to be cash generative while it lasts. The other product/service horizons are segregated and typically have a different go-to-market team (with appropriate Key Performance Indicators) assigned to each:

Focus Areas

The development pattern for Horizon 2 products are typical of the transition from “Chasm” into the “Tornado” stage on the normal Chasm lifecycle diagram. It’s a relentless learning experience, ruthlessly designing out custom services to form a standard offering for the market segments you target:

Free Resources to Context

As you execute through the various sales teams and move between financial years, there’s a lot of introspection to ensure that the focus on likely winners continues is appropriately ruthless:

Action

The sales teams driving Horizon 2 offerings should be seeking to aim high in customer organisations and drive strategies to establish a beachhead, then dominate, specific focus segments. In doing so, be mindful that a small supporting community tends to cross reference each other. Good salespeople get to know the people networks that do so, and work diligently to connect across them with their colleagues.

Trusted Advisor

The positioning of your Horizon 2 offers tend to vary depending on price and benefit; this in turn looks about like the findings from another seminal work, “The Discipline of Market Leaders”. That book suggested that really successful companies put their relentless effort into only one of three possible core competences; to be the Product Innovator, to be Customer Intimate or to be Operationally Excellent:

Benefit Sensitivity

Once you have the positioning, the Horizon 2 sales team relentlessly focus on the key people or organisations that make up their target market segment(s):

Drive to Share of Segment

The number of organisations they engage differ markedly between Enterprise (Complex) and Consumer (Volume) markets:

Target Customers

So the engagement checklist needs to address all these areas:

Target Market Initiatives

The sales team need to be able to articulate “What makes their offer different”:

Differentials

Then pick their targets:

Growing Horizon 2

Above all, be conscious who your competitors are and where you’re positioned against them:

From Whom

That’s largely it. Just a process to keep assessing the source of future revenue and profits, and ensuring you segment your sales teams to drive both this years business, and separately working on the green shoots that will provide your future. And avoiding what often happens, which is that the existing high revenue or high profit lines demand so much resources that they suffocate your future.

You can probably name a few companies that have done exactly that. Yours doesn’t need to be the next one now!

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