Help available to keep malicious users away from your good work

Picture of a Stack of Tins of Spam Meat

One thing that still routinely shocks me is the shear quantity of malicious activity that goes on behind the scenes of any web site i’ve put up. When we were building Internet Vulnerability Testing Services at BT, around 7 new exploits or attack vectors were emerging every 24 hours. Fortunately, for those of us who use Open Source software, the protections have usually been inherent in the good design of the code, and most (OpenSSL heartbleed excepted) have had no real impact with good planning. All starting with closing off ports, and restricting access to some key ones from only known fixed IP addresses (that’s the first thing I did when I first provisioned our servers in Digital Ocean Amsterdam – just surprised they don’t give a template for you to work from – fortunately I keep my own default rules to apply immediately).

With WordPress, it’s required an investment in a number of plugins to stem the tide. Basic ones like Comment Control, that  can lock down pages, posts, images and attachments from having comments added to them (by default, spammers paradise). Where you do allow comments, you install the WordPress provided Akismet, which at least classifies 99% of the SPAM attempts and sticks them in the spam folder straight away. For me, I choose to moderate any comment from someone i’ve not approved content from before, and am totally ruthless with any attempt at social engineering; the latter because if they post something successfully with approval a couple of times, their later comment spam with unwanted links get onto the web site immediately until I later notice and take them down. I prefer to never let them get to that stage in the first place.

I’ve been setting up a web site in our network for my daughter in law to allow her to blog abound Mental Health issues for Children, including ADHD, Aspergers and related afflictions. For that, I installed BuddyPress to give her user community a discussion forum, and went to bed knowing I hadn’t even put her domain name up – it was just another set of deep links into my WordPress network at the time.

By the morning, 4 user registrations, 3 of them with spoof addresses. Duly removed, and the ability to register usernames then turned off completely while I fix things. I’m going into install WP-FB-Connect to allow Facebook users to work on the site based on their Facebook login credentials, and to install WangGuard to stop the “Splogger” bots. That is free for us for the volume of usage we expect (and the commercial dimensions of the site – namely non-profit and charitable), and appears to do a great job  sharing data on who and where these attempts come from. Just got to check that turning these on doesn’t throw up a request to login if users touch any of the other sites in the WordPress network we run on our servers, whose user communities don’t need to logon at any time, at all.

Unfortunately, progress was rather slowed down over the weekend by a reviewer from Kenya who published a list of best 10 add-ins to BuddyPress, #1 of which was a Social Network login product that could authenticate with Facebook or Twitter. Lots of “Great Article, thanks” replies. In reality, it didn’t work with BuddyPress at all! Duly posted back to warn others, if indeed he lets that news of his incompetence in that instance back to his readers.

As it is, a lot of WordPress Plugins (there are circa 157 of them to do social site authentication alone) are of variable quality. I tend to judge them by the number of support requests received that have been resolved quickly in the previous few weeks – one nice feature of the plugin listings provided. I also have formal support contracts in with Cyberchimps (for some of their themes) and with WPMU Dev (for some of their excellent Multisite add-ons).

That aside, we now have the network running with all the right tools and things seem to be working reliably. I’ve just added all the page hooks for Google Analytics and Bing Web Tools to feed from, and all is okay at this stage. The only thing i’d like to invest in is something to watch all the various log files on the server and to give me notifications if anything awry is happening (like MySQL claiming an inability to connect to the WordPress database, or Apache spawning multiple instances and running out of memory – something I had in the early days when the Google bot was touching specific web pages, since fixed).

Just a shame that there are still so many malicious link spammers out there; they waste 30 minutes of my day every day just clearing their useless gunk out. But thank god that Google are now penalising these very effectively; long may that continue, and hopefully the realisation of the error of their ways will lead to being a more useful member of the worldwide community going forward.

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